Cargando


 

Avizora Atajo Publicaciones Noticias Biografías

Biografías
Emilio Salgari

Ir al catálogo de monografías
y textos sobre otros temas

Glosarios - Biografías
Textos históricos

ENLACES RECOMENDADOS:

- Annemarie Schwarzenbach
- William Shakespeare
- Literatura
- Julio Verne Vida y obra
- Wells y la ciencia de la ficción

 

Google

Avizora - Atajo Google

 


Emilio Salgari

. Biografía en Español

 

Biography

Emilio Salgari (August 21, 1862 – April 25, 1911) was a writer of action adventure swashbucklers and a pioneer of science fiction in Italy.

Salgari was born in Verona. After a failed attempt to become a naval officer he turned his passion for exploration and discovery to writing. He wrote more than two hundred adventure stories and novels, setting his tales in exotic locations, with heroes from a wide variety of cultures.

While extremely popular in Italy, Portugal and Spanish speaking countries (known as the Italian Jules Verne, although his works were usually more about cliffhanger adventures than speculative or scientific fiction), he remains less known in the rest of the world.

Sandokan: The Tigers of Mompracem and Sandokan: The Pirates of Malaysia are at present the only titles available in English. The deeds of the fictitious Sandokan seem to be loosely based on the exploits of Libau, a Dayak chieftain resisting James Brooke from his hideout at Mount Sandok in Sarawak.

Though his characters achieved an almost immortal fame, and Mr. Salgari had millions of readers, he never attained the financial success and stability he deserved. His publishers, taking advantage of his poor business skills, left him almost destitute. Overwhelmed by creditors and family misfortunes, he committed suicide in Turin, on April 25, 1911. In one last act, drawn from his vast research and imagination, he slit his throat and stomach, in the ceremonial suicide of the Japanese samurai.

But though the dreamer was gone, his books continued to sell and many owe their love of adventure, reading and writing to the characters and stories he created. Composers Pietro Mascagni and Giacomo Puccini were contemporary fans; later Umberto Eco and Federico Fellini would read Salgari to explore the world. Sergio Leone, one of the fathers of the spaghetti western, got his first glimpse of the outlaw hero in the pages of Mr. Salgari's books.

Mr. Salgari is particularly popular in Latin America. Isabel Allende, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Pablo Neruda, Luis Sepulveda, Octavio Paz and Carlos Fuentes all devoured his works in their youth. Che Guevara first read of boarding raids, jungle warfare and battles against injustice in Mr. Salgari's adventure novels. Guevara read 62 of Mr. Salgari's books causing his biographer Paco Ignacio Taibo II to remark that one could see that Che's anti-imperialism was "salgariano in origin."

Several of Mr. Salgari's novels were adapted for the big screen, Vitale De Stefano being the first to direct some of Salgari's pirates in the early 1920s. Lex Barker appeared as the tiger hunter Tremal-Naik in the 1955 B-movie The Mystery of The Black Jungle, while Sandokan was played by muscle man and Hercules star Steve Reeves in Sandokan the Great and The Pirates of The Seven Seas. Ray Danton took his turn playing the pirate in Luigi Capuano's Sandokan Against the Leopard of Sarawak (aka Throne of Vengeance.) and later reprised the role along with most of the original cast in Sandokan Fights Back (aka The Conqueror and the Empress).

It wasn't until 1976 that the quintessential Sandokan was cast, Kabir Bedi played the Tiger of Malaysia and took Europe by storm. He later reprised the role in the late 90s in a series of sequels.

Though popular with the masses, Emilio Salgari was shunned by critics throughout his life and for most of the 20th century. It wasn't until the late 1990s that his writings began to be revisited and new translations appeared in print.

The Sandokan Series

Sandokan "The Tiger of Malaysia" is Emilio Salgari's most enduring creation. Orphaned when the British murdered his family and stole his throne, Sandokan gathered a legion of pirates and took to the sea to attain his vengeance. Under the command of Sandokan and his loyal friend Yanez de Gomera, the Tigers of Mompracem fight for the defense of tiny native kingdoms against the colonial powers of the Dutch and British empires.

The first Sandokan adventure appeared in serial form in the La Nuova Arena in 1883, and was published as Le tigri di Mompracem in 1900. The tale proved so popular, the characters so intriguing, that it spawned a legion of sequels, pitting Sandokan and Yanez against a variety of enemies: Rajah James Brooke, Governor of Sarawak, better known as The Exterminator for the merciless way he hunted down pirates; the Thugs of the Kali cult in the Indian Sunderbands, and a variety of petty dictators and colonial powers. Salgari's pen transformed the bloodthirsty pirate into a noble warrior, a kind of Malay Robin Hood, imbuing his characters with a strong sense of idealism, passion, and loyalty.

Emilio Salgari The Italian Jules Verne

“To read is to travel without all the hassles of luggage.”
- Emilio Salgari (1863-1911)

Writer of action adventure swashbucklers and a pioneer of science fiction in Italy, Emilio Salgari was born in Verona on August 21, 1862, to a family of modest merchants.

When his dream to captain his own vessel and explore the world was shattered by poor marks at a naval institute in Venice, he turned his passion for exploration and discovery to writing. Though Mr. Salgari wrote more than a hundred adventures set in distant and exotic lands, he only managed to sail the seas once — a short cruise along the shores of the Adriatic.

Sandokan (La Tigre della Malesia) first appeared in serial form in the La Nuova Arena in 1883 and 1884. The novel brought fame but very little financial success. A gifted imagination and abysmal financial skill would remain constants in his life.

In 1892 he married Ida Peruzzi, an actress, with whom he had four children. Offered a contract by the Speirani publishing house, the family moved to Turin where Mr. Salgari wrote around 30 works between 1892 and 1898. In 1897, King Umberto of Italy bestowed him with the title of "Chevalier of the Crown." In 1898 the family moved once again, this time to Genoa, to work with the publisher Anthony Donath.

Despite his popularity and the success of his works, his poor business skills prevented him from obtaining any kind of financial stability. His wife had gone insane during the course of their marriage and caring for her drove him further into debt. Overwhelmed by creditors and family misfortunes, he committed suicide in Turin, on April 25, 1911. In one last act, drawn from his vast research and imagination, he slit his throat and abdomen, imitating the ceremonial suicide of the Japanese samurai. He left behind two letters — one addressed to his children and another, dripping with contempt, to his publishers, whom he asked to pay for the cost of his funeral.

All in all, he wrote more than two hundred adventure stories and novels, many of which are considered to be classics for both adults and young readers. Set in exotic locations, with heroes from a wide variety of cultures, Mr. Salgari used his powerful imagination to bring the wonders of the world to the doorstep of generations of readers. Though unknown to the English-speaking world, his works have been translated into seven languages and twenty-six of his novels can be found in the U.S. Library of Congress.
 


 

AVIZORA.COM
Política de Privacidad
Webmaster: webmaster@avizora.com
Copyright © 2001 m.
Avizora.com